Constructing of the Empire State Building

February 29, 2016 5:32 PM
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The Empire State Building was designed by William F. Lamb from the architectural firm Shreve, Lamb and Harmon, which produced the building drawings in just two weeks, using its earlier designs for the Reynolds Building in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and the Carew Tower in Cincinnati, Ohio (designed by the architectural firm W. W. Ahlschlager & Associates) as a basis. Every year the staff of the Empire State Building sends a Father’s Day card to the staff at the Reynolds Building in Winston-Salem to pay homage to its role as predecessor to the Empire State Building. The building was designed from the top down. The general contractors were The Starrett Brothers and Eken, and the project was financed primarily by John J. Raskob and Pierre S. du Pont. The construction company was chaired by Alfred E. Smith, a former Governor of New York and James Farley’s General Builders Supply Corporation supplied the building materials. John W. Bowser was project construction superintendent.

29 Sep 1930 --- Original caption: All in a day's work. Flirting with danger is just routine work for the steel workers arranging the steel frame for the Empire State Building, which will be the world's tallest structure when completed. Erected on the site of the old Waldorf Astoria, this building will rise 1,284 feet into the air. A zeppelin mooring mast will cap this engineering feat. --- Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

29 Oct 1930 --- A construction worker hangs from an industrial crane during the construction of the Empire State Building. --- Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

01 May 1931 --- Original caption: Ex-Governor Alfred E. Smith, Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt, and others at the top of the Empire State Building, tallest in the world, gazing out over the New York panorama. This scene took place immediately after the official opening of the structure this morning, which was completed when President Herbert Hoover pressed a telegraph key back in Washington, DC, which turned on all of the building's lights. Mr. Smith is the president of the company that built the building. --- Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

13 Sep 1930 --- Original caption: 9/13/1930-New York City: Carl Russell waves to his co-workers on the structural work of the 88th floor of the new Empire State Building. When complete the highest man-made structure in the world will rise 1,222 feet above the intersection of Fifth Avenue and Thirty-fourth Street. The cameraman risked his life climbing a derrick to snap this unusual photograph. Notice the "Toy" cars and the ant-sized pedestrians walking about Herald Square almost a quarter of a mile below. --- Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

1929-1931, Manhattan, New York City, New York State, USA --- Empire State Building Under Construction --- Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

26 Jan 1932 --- Original caption: It may be painful for the ant-like spectators in the street below, but it's all in a day's work for these smiling window washers as they go about their precarious work cleaning up the Empire State Building, world's tallest structure, at dizzy heights of hundreds of feet above the street. The startling "shot" was made by the photographer looking down upon the window washers on the 34th street side of the world-famed building. Note the tiny insects that are motor cars and pedestrians. --- Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

29 Sep 1930 --- Original caption: 9/29/30-New York: Flirting with danger is just routine work for the steel workers arranging the steel frame for the Empire State Building, which will be the world's tallest structure when completed. Erected on the site of the old Waldorf Astoria, this building will rise 1,284 feet into the air. A zeppelin mooring mast with cap this engineering feat. BPA2 #4510 --- Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

02 Dec 1932, Manhattan, New York City, New York State, USA --- Original caption: New York City: Lighting Up 'Way Up.' A striking silhouette atop the gigantic RCA Building in Rockefeller Center, New York, as workmen light their cigarettes at the end of a working day. The Empire State Building rises dramatically in the background. --- Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

Original caption: 9/29/30-New York: Flirting with danger is just routine work for the steel workers arranging the steel frame for the Empire State Building, which will be the world's tallest structure when completed. erected on the site of the old Waldorf Astoria, this building will rise 1,284 feet into the air. A zeppelin mooring mast will cap this engineering feat. --- Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

29 Sep 1930 --- Original caption: Flirting with danger is just routine work for the steel workers arranging the steel frame for the Empire State Building, which will be the world's tallest structure when completed. Erected on the site of the old Waldorf Astoria, this building will rise 1,284 feet into the air. A zeppelin mooring mast will cap this engineering feat. --- Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

Original caption: 9/19/1930-New York, NY-Workmen at the new Empire State building that is being erected on the site of the old Waldorf Astoria Hotel at 34th Street and 5th Avenue. in New York, by a corporation headed by the former Governor Al Smith, raised a flag on the 88th story of the great building, 1,048 feet above the street. the flag thus is at the highest point in the city higher then the Crystler Building. Photo shows the workmen at the ceremonies. --- Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

26 Jan 1932 --- Original caption: It may be painful for the ant-like spectators in the street below, but it's all in a day's work for these smiling window washers as they go about their precarious work cleaning up the Empire State Building, world's tallest structure, at dizzy heights of hundreds of feet above the street. The startling "shot" was made by the photographer looking down upon the window washers on the 34th street side of the world-famed building. Note the tiny insects that are motor cars and pedestrians. --- Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS


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